YOUR FAVORITE RAPPER’S FAVORITE PRODUCER: DJ DAHI

DJDAHI

Exceedingly eclectic, unpretentious, and refreshingly talented, Dacoury Natche is all of the above.

More commonly known as his production aficionado alias, DJ Dahi, the DJ turned producer is without question your favorite rappers favorite producer. Flying under the radar and over delivering seems to be a successful tactic for the Los Angeles resident. Fuck fame and profiling, the music savant is busy cooking up indisputable hits like Drake’s “Worst Behavior” and Big Sean’s “IDFWU”. Making it all too obvious why legendary icons like Madonna have already come calling to work with the young innovator.

 

After scoring a Grammy nod for his work on Kendrick Lamar’s critically acclaimed album, Good Kid Maad City, last year and racking up another along-side Schoolboy Q, this year, we don’t see the rhythmic renegade slowing down any time soon. One second he’s placing organically soulful and symphonically colossal tracks that slap harder than a jaded ex with the world’s most popular rapper and the next he’s creating a nostalgic and hauntingly melodic indie track with strategically placed drums that you can’t stop playing because it sticks to your ribs. Whether he’s collaborating with Lily Allen or Lupe Fiasco the guy always brings his A game. He’s learned the rules and learned how to properly defy them and we want to know how.

“When people are partying, I’d rather be working. Some people want to be around you because you’re hot. If you weren’t making music that was popular, people wouldn’t give a fuck what you are.”

 

BYC:  Another Grammy season has come and gone. Last year you attended after scoring a Grammy nod for Kendrick’s Money Trees. This time around you were up for Best Rap Album by way of Schoolboy Q’s Oxymoron. Do those accolades hold much relevance to you?

DAHI: I appreciate the nomination. Overall it’s just great to be recognized for my work. I would love to win one but it won’t validate my career. I’m making music in the end. I just want a catalog of music that people will listen to for a long time.

 

BYC: Well I think it’s safe to say that you’ve definitely got some classics on your resume. What do you usually listen to outside of work or what’s currently playing in your rotation at home?

DAHI: I’ve been listening to Haim lately. I really just like the Energy they make together. I’ve also been listening to Lupe Fiasco. Lupe got them bars!

 

BYC:  Yeah, just ask him. Is there anyone that you listen to that would catch us off guard?

DAHI: Not really. I really think that if you listen to my music, you can tell that I have a diverse ear. So whatever I’m feeling for the moment will influence what I’ll make today or tomorrow.

 

BYC:  So what all goes into making a Dahi beat? Talk us through the process?

DAHI: It’s kind of hard to explain, but the main thing I can say is that it’s all about paying attention. Making beats is a constant fly catching moment. You have to hold on to your ideas before they slip away. Overall, you just have to make music that makes you feel good. If the beat doesn’t make you get up and move then it may not be a good track.

 

“That’s why I really like Schoolboy Q. When we did the Hell of a Night record it was definitely different from what people might think as a hip-hop record. I called it a hybrid record of dance and rap. I think it came out really dope.”

 DJ DAHIBYC:  Fair enough. You do have some artists whose projects you frequent quite often like a few of the members of TDE. Is that because of a mutual appreciation for each other’s artistic abilities or a little Los Angeles loyalty?

DAHI: It’s all a vibe and energy thing for me. I am the type a producer that tries different things. If you’re willing to go along for the ride we will end up in a place that we didn’t expect. That’s why I really like Schoolboy Q. When we did the Hell of a Night record it was definitely different from what people might think as a hip-hop record. I called it a hybrid record of dance and rap. I think it came out really dope.

 

BYC:  There’s a certain comradery in the Los Angeles music scene. Do you find yourself being surrounded with a lot of “industry people” these days or same city, same friends?

DAHI: Nope, I kind of keep myself separate from the industry people. When people are partying, I’d rather be working. Some people want to be around you because you’re hot. If you weren’t making music that was popular, people wouldn’t give a fuck what you are. Overall it’s a vibe thing. There are a lot of good people in the music industry, you just have to see where their intentions are and decide if you want to associate yourself in that circle.
BYC: Is there a significant difference in working with someone like Lily Allen verses a rapper?

DAHI: Nope Lily Allen is gangsta. She’s got a potty mouth like a sailor but she’s mad cool.

 

BYC: You went to London to work on Sheezus with Lily Allen, how did you find the music scene differed from the states?

 

“I really want to find someone who can bring a fresh perspective to the world. I feel that my career as a producer will be solidified by me breaking a new artist. It’s like your true stamp in the game.”

 

DAHI: They love soul music out there. More than we do out in the states. They really appreciate artistry in a lot of ways. But you can still tell that they want the American validation.

 

BYC:  As far as other artists that you’ve yet to work with, who is on your wish list as of now?

DAHI: I really want to find someone who can bring a fresh perspective to the world. I feel that my career as a producer will be solidified by me breaking a new artist. It’s like your true stamp in the game.
BYC:  You seem to not only have an unquestionably talented approach to making music but also quite an ear for new talent. We saw that you worked with Timbaland’s new artist, Tink.

DAHI: Tink is a real artist in every sense. She has something to say about the conditions of her environment. She gives a perspective that is new and old at the same time. She has a vision for all of her records. She doesn’t go out of pocket. She’s going to have a big year she’s going to wake people up. I just believe in her.

“She’s going to have a big year she’s going to wake people up. I just believe in her.”

 

BYC: You’ve said that you’re a pretty big J. Dilla fan and rightfully so. Outside of cultural fixtures like Ye, Pharrell and Timbaland, what producers presently catch your
ear in 2015?

DAHI: Man there’s so many producers that I really like, I don’t want to list them because I know I’ll forget somebody haha.

 

“Lily Allen is gangsta. She’s got a potty mouth like a sailor but she’s mad cool.”

 

BYC: I’ve heard a lot of producers say that it’s a numbers game, the more beats you submit the more you place. What would your advice be to up and coming producers?

DAHI: Just make records that make you feel good about whom you are. And pay attention to your surroundings. You never know what could spark a great record.

Written By: Brenn Colleen